My second summer as a photographer: an Italian vacation

Intro

In May, my spouse and I went on a three weeks trip to Italy (mostly) and France. We were celebrating a number of things, but most importantly, her 40th birthday. Venice, Rome, Tuscany, Cinque Terre, Burgundy and Paris. Quite a trip, I know.

I started this blog with a story about our vacation last year. 3,739 pictures later, here is the story from an enthusiast photographer point of view.

This story is presented in 6 parts:

Settings and Techniques Part I

We had marvellous weather, never any cloud, except for a single rainy day. Great for vacation, so-so for photography. But I won’t complain. For this reason, I often had to under expose by 1/3, sometimes by 2/3, or even a full stop!

All that sunny weather caused other issues. For some reason, and I am sure their is a good one for that, all churches appear to face north. This means that during day time when you want to take a picture of their facade, you always have the sun in your face. And you know that photographically speaking this is not good.

I used a couple of technique to mitigate this. First, I would creep up close enough so that the sun would eventually be hidden by the church’s top.
Voyage Italie-France Mai 2011- 1120.jpg

The second technique was, well, pure improvisation. Here, I was lucky enough to have the lamp post hanging on a wire between the church and the baptistery. The sun is actually behind the lamp post!

Voyage Italie-France Mai 2011- 664 (1).jpg

I had planned to bring my monopod and a bean bag for night photography. Didn’t. I did bring my GorillaPod, never used neither. It could have been useful for some shot of streets at night, instead I simply laid my camera where I could: bridge ramps, sidewalks or sometimes event the sides of the buildings for vertical shots.
Voyage Italie-France Mai 2011- 301.jpg

Voyage Italie-France Mai 2011- 163 (1).jpg

When shooting with supports, you should always use lowest ISO possible and smallest aperture (because you are probably taking a landscape shot). You should also activate long exposure noise reduction. And remember that if you can’t get good support, ISO 1600 or 3200 is more than good enough, especially if your intention is more about capturing the moment.
Voyage Italie-France Mai 2011- 1145.jpg

Next Post: Settings and Techniques Part II

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Photography and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

11 Responses to My second summer as a photographer: an Italian vacation

  1. Pingback: My second summer as a photographer: an Italian vacation – Part II « MaxPhotoBlog.net

  2. Pingback: HungryTampa | Blog | My second summer as a photographer: an Italian vacation – Part II <b>...</b>

  3. Pingback: My second summer as a photographer: an Italian vacation – Part III | MaxPhotoBlog.net

  4. Pingback: Cinque Terre - Italy

  5. Pingback: My second summer as a photographer: an Italian vacation – Part IV | MaxPhotoBlog.net

  6. Pingback: My second summer as a photographer: an Italian vacation – Part V | MaxPhotoBlog.net

  7. Pingback: My second summer as a photographer: an Italian vacation – Part VI | MaxPhotoBlog.net

  8. Pingback: 6 Tips for Photographing the Churches of Europe | MaxPhotoBlog.net

  9. Pingback: Second portrait photoshoot | MaxPhotoBlog.net

  10. Pingback: My Italian vacation: a photographer’s recap | MaxPhotoBlog.net

  11. Pingback: Pictures in Venice | MaxPhotoBlog.net

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s