Lightroom lacks the focus point

I am a new LR user. I wrote a post on my first impressions coming from the Aperture world.

Last night I was reviewing some shots and I tried to get LR to show me where the focus point was on some of my pictures.

You may ask the legitimate question: why (how) would I use it in my workflow?

Here’s why: When pictures are blurry, I want to know if is because the subject (birds in this case) moved, because I moved, because the focus point was not set right, because there was too many “particles” in the air, because because because…

So, yes, I got used to working the focus point active in AP. Option-F on your keyboard.

I searched a number of online forums including my reference, LightroomForums.net. Niet.

Unfortunately, a much discussed plug-in there is not yet available. And a Google search does not give me more.

In my post, I spoke of the good, the bad and the ugly. I had no ‘ugly’ yet.

Maybe the lack of a focus point will go on that list…

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6 Responses to Lightroom lacks the focus point

  1. Vincent F says:

    Maxime I think you should stop your quest for the Holy Grail – it does not exist. I am using Lightroom for quite a while, and it is the first time that I actually notice what you are mentioning about the focusing points and for one good reason probably; I am using my camera software, so if I want to see the focusing point, that’s where I’ll have a look at it, if I do. If my pictures are blurry I know the cause and it has nothing to do with an alien spaceship disrupting the space-time continuum, nor a bee getting in the way, but me the user. I find out why just by looking at the picture and remembering how I took it – I don’t need a software for that, and move on to the next picture.

    I import my pictures using Canon Digital Photo Professional, which is a very capable software and I am convince that the same goes for Nikon Capture, then choose the picture worth keeping for post processing using Canon’s software simply because it is easier for me to do so, and I stress out the “for me” – then comes along Lightroom (there isn’t a perfect workflow neither, and I am not pretending that my way of doing things is right, nor wrong, but it works for me, and the same goes for everyone, meaning having something that suits your needs).

    Unworthy pictures of post processing and editing don’t go or land into Lightroom, period. I know, and you do too, a lot of great names as pro photographers who don’t seems to be bother by that, so… It is not a tool for analysing pictures, but to do post processing and make good and great shots look even better.

    I might be wrong, but you sound a little bit unsecure and frankly you shouldn’t – relax and continue enjoying taking pictures as you are doing, you’ll see it is more enjoyable this way. And frankly a lot of your shots are great, continue on that path, you are on the good one.

    If you still want to know wich focusing point(s) you used, here’s a way:
    1. Shoot some photos with different focus points, e.g. (center, upper left, upper right, lower left, lower right).
    2. See how they are named in metadata (e.g. via ExifMeta).
    3. Use your camera manufacturer software to determine where exactly these points fall on a photo.
    4. Record focus point names and corresponding positions for future reference.
    You could record these using a pencil and paper sketch, or using software tools like TechSmith’s SnagIt, …, or just make notes in your head…

    See: http://forums.adobe.com/message/3335813

    Cheers.

  2. maximegousse says:

    Alien spaceship disrupting the space-time continuum? I thought that you had stopped smoking LOL!!!

    • Vincent F says:

      I did; a very long time ago. I only see two things then; long term side effects or bystander smoking effects! On a more serious note, I recently got inspired by one of my favourite movie director, Stanley Kubrick, while watching one of his movies about writing an article. It will be published next month and entitled: Vincent, photographer – or how I learned to stop worrying about the DAM (thing) and loved photography.

  3. Vincent F says:

    NOTE: I am replying to myself because I pressed the “Post Comment” fonction without editing my own draft (I might as well have used Lightroom for that, so sorry for being an idiot). So here’s what the post should have been:
    Maxime I think you should stop your quest for the Holy Grail – it does not exist. I have been using Lightroom for quite a while now, and it is the first time that I actually notice what you are mentioning about the focusing points and for one good reason probably; I am using my camera software to transfer my pictures to my hard drives, so if I want to see the focusing point, that’s the software I will use and that’s where I’ll have a look at these focussing points – if I do. If my pictures are blurry I know the cause of it, and it had nothing to do with an alien spaceship disrupting the space-time continuum, nor a bee getting in the way, but me the user. I will take the opportunity then if I want to find out why just by looking at the picture and remembering how I took it – I don’t need a software for that, and move on to the next picture.

    I import my pictures using Canon Digital Photo Professional, which is a very capable software and I am convince that the same goes for Nikon Capture, then choose the picture worth keeping for post processing using Canon’s software simply because it is easier for me to do so, and I stress out the “for me” – then comes along Lightroom that I will be using as a photo management and editing software solution (there isn’t a perfect workflow neither, and I am not pretending that my way of doing things is right, nor wrong, but it works for me, and the same goes for everyone, meaning having something that suits your needs).

    Unworthy pictures of post processing and editing for me don’t go or land into Lightroom, period. I know, and you do too, a lot of great names as pro photographers who don’t seems to be bother by the fact that there’ isn’t any focussing points, or they haven’t come forward to mention it, so… It is not a tool for analysing pictures, but to do management and post processing to make your good or great shots look even better.

    I might be wrong, but you sound a little bit to worried and frankly you shouldn’t – relax and continue enjoying taking pictures as you are doing, you’ll see it is more pl;easent this way. And frankly, a lot of your shots are great, continue on that path, you are on the good one.

    If you still want to know wich focusing point(s) you used, here’s a way:
    1. Shoot some photos with different focus points, e.g. (center, upper left, upper right, lower left, lower right).
    2. See how they are named in metadata (e.g. via ExifMeta).
    3. Use your camera manufacturer software to determine where exactly these points fall on a photo.
    4. Record focus point names and corresponding positions for future reference.
    You could record these using a pencil and paper sketch, or using software tools like TechSmith’s SnagIt, …, or just make notes in your head…

    See: http://forums.adobe.com/message/3335813

    Cheers.

    My appologies for the firs version – hope this is a lifttle bit better.

  4. maximegousse says:

    Much better!!!!!!! hihi

  5. Hey There. I discovered your blog using msn. This is a really smartly written article.
    I’ll be sure to bookmark it and return to learn more of your useful info.
    Thank you for the post. I will certainly comeback.

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